marți, 25 septembrie 2012

Success 2012: Agnieszka Radwańska, polish professional tennis player ranked world no. 3

Agnieszka Radwańska (born 6 March 1989) is a Polish professional tennis player. As of 24 September 2012, she is ranked world no. 3. Known for constructing points and making intelligent use of the court, she has won ten career singles titles.

Radwańska reached the final of the 2012 Wimbledon Championships, becoming the first Polish player in the Open Era to reach a Grand Slam singles final. In 2007, she also became the first Polish player to claim a WTA singles title when she won the Nordea Nordic Light Open. Radwańska has won two WTA Awards, being voted Most Impressive Newcomer in 2006, and Fan Favorite Singles Player in 2011.
Born in Kraków, Agnieszka Radwańska began playing tennis at the age of four after her father introduced her to the sport. Her younger sister, Urszula, also plays tennis. Radwańska has named Pete Sampras and Martina Hingis as inspirations.
In 2009 Radwańska became a WTA ambassador for Habitat for Humanity. She has also studied tourism at universities in Kraków.

2012: World No 2 & first Grand Slam final

During the first four months of 2012, Radwańska won two singles titles and amassed a record of 28–5, defeating all opponents but then-world no. 1 Victoria Azarenka.
Following losses in the Apia International, the Australian Open, and the Qatar Total Open, she won her first title of the season at the Dubai Tennis Championships, defeating Julia Görges in straight sets. After advancing to the quarterfinals in Indian Wells, she reached a new ranking of world no. 4.  Her second title came at the Sony Ericsson Open, where she defeated Venus Williams in the quarterfinals and Marion Bartoli in the semifinals, advancing to a championship match against Maria Sharapova. Radwańska won the championship without losing a set throughout the tournament. 
Her fifth loss of the season, and fifth to Azarenka, came in the semifinals of the Porsche Tennis Grand Prix in Stuttgart.  She then entered the Mutua Madrid Open, where she lost to Azarenka in the semifinals, securing the world no. 3 ranking. At the Internazionali BNL d'Italia, she lost her opening-round match to Petra Cetkovská, marking her first loss of the year to someone other than Azarenka. In the final of the Brussels Open, Radwańska defeated Simona Halep in straight sets, winning her third WTA title of the year and tenth in her career. At the French Open, she defeated Venus Williams in the second round, but then fell in the third round to Svetlana Kuznetsova.
Radwańska reached her first career Grand Slam final at the 2012 Wimbledon Championships. She defeated Maria Kirilenko in the quarterfinals and Angelique Kerber in the semifinals, losing the championship match to Serena Williams in three sets. By advancing to the final, she became the first Polish player in the Open Era to reach the championship round of a Grand Slam singles tournament, and attained a new ranking of world no. 2. Radwańska was the flag bearer for Poland in the 2012 Summer Olympics.  She lost in the opening round to Julia Görges. 
She reached the quarterfinals of the Rogers Cup and the Western & Southern Open, losing to Li Na in both tournaments. Radwańska was defeated in the fourth round of the 2012 US Open by Roberta Vinci of Italy


Rivalries

Radwańska vs. Zvonareva

Radwańska has a rivalry with Russian player Vera Zvonareva, which began in 2007. Radwańska leads the series 4–2.

Throughout their meetings, Radwańska has proven able to match Zvonareva's pace and movements around the court.Zvonareva is considered the more powerful of the two, while Radwańska has been noted as more focused at times, utilizing what Sports Illustrated's Courtney Nguyen dubbed "selective aggression" during the pair's 2011 matches.
Their first match occurred during the 2007 Kremlin Cup, with Zvonareva winning in straight sets. The two did not play again until the 2011 season, when Radwańska won four of their five matches—including the finals of the Mercury Insurance Open and the Pan Pacific Open. Their final meeting of 2011 was an acclaimed match at the WTA Championships. Trailing 3–5 in the third set, Radwańska saved three match points and went on to win 1–6, 6–2, 7–5. The victory marked her fourth straight win against Zvonareva, who she described as "very consistent and always tough to beat."

Radwańska vs. Azarenka

Radwańska and Victoria Azarenka first played in 2006. Azarenka leads their head-to-head 11–3. During the 2006 Wimbledon Championships, Radwańska won their first meeting in straight sets. The two would go on to meet regularly in the following seasons, often in quarterfinal or semifinal matches. Throughout the first four months of 2012, the only player to defeat Radwańska was Azarenka
 
Playing style and equipment
 
In 2012, Tom Perrotta of The Wall Street Journal called Radwańska "the most tactically sound, subtle tennis player in the world."
Radwańska's game is founded on variety, mobility, and a tendency to anticipate her opponent's movements.She often uses this style to construct rallies—either opening the court up for a winner, or prompting a surprised opponent to hit a misplaced return. Her primary weapons include a mixture of slices and lobs, along with her ability to hit the ball at a variety of angles.She also makes use of a disguised drop shot, often swung with the same motion as a normal stroke during a rally. She is also noted for her crouching shots, during which she quickly drops in place to return or redirect a low ball, along with her use of an overhead backhand while on defense.
Tennis commentators, including former pro Wojciech Fibak, have compared her playing style to that of Martina Hingis, with Fibak describing her as "a natural mover who understands the geometry of the court". Radwańska has cited Hingis as an inspiration. She and Hingis had their lone career meeting in 2007, with Radwańska winning in three sets.
Radwańska uses Babolat Pure Drive Lite GT racquets, and is sponsored by Lotto apparel.

marți, 18 septembrie 2012

Success 2012: Dr. Robert N. McClelland, instructor in surgery at Parkland Memorial Hospital in 1963. He was among the team of doctors in Trauma Room One who worked on President J.F. Kennedy. Less than two days later, he also assisted in the treatment of Lee Harvey Oswald


 Dr. McClelland's story is almost unbelievable: Not only was he on hand to assist the surgical team trying to save President Kennedy's life after the motorcade shooting in 1963, he was also called in two days later to tend to Lee Harvey Oswald's (fatal) wounds.
(His accounts of these two emergency room proceedings are both coldly clinical and harrowing. In the case of the late president, for instance, McClelland describes how a portion of Kennedy's cerebrum fell out of the gaping wound in his skull and onto the operating table while surgeons were exploring a wound in his throat.)
Two years prior to the presidential assassination, McClelland paid a visit to Baylor Hospital to pick up his wife's paycheck. As he approached the side door, three black limos pulled up. A stern looking character invited the doc to step aside -- which he did -- and out of one of the cars stepped President John F. Kennedy. The new president was there to visit Senator Sam Rayburn, hospitalized for pancreatic cancer.
On a later occasion, McClelland was called in to assist a colleague with an exploratory surgery. Arriving at the hospital, he was directed to the operating room and took time to check the patient's clipboard beforehand. His name? Abraham Zapruder.
Interestingly, Dr. McClelland is convinced that more than one shooter was involved in the Kennedy assassination. According to Marian Ann J. Montgomery -- now Executive Director of PCHPS and one-time director of interpretation at the Sixth Floor Museum -- he is one of the few doctors on the scene at the time who now support this view.
PHOTO signed for me: Dr. Robert McClelland holds the blood-stained shirt he wore in the Parkland Hospital Emergency Room on the day he and other doctors tried to save John Kennedy Randal Ford

Testimony Of Dr. Robert M. Mcclelland Resumed
The testimony of Dr. Robert M. McClelland was taken at 3:25 p.m., March 25, 1964, at Parkland Memorial Hospital, Dallas, Tex., by Mr. Arlen Specter, assistant counsel of the President's Commission.
Mr. SPECTER - May the record show that Dr. Robert M. McClelland has return to have a brief additional deposition concerning a translation of "L' Express which has been called to my attention in the intervening time which has elapsed between March 21, when I took Dr. McClelland's deposition on the first occasion, and today.
Dr. McClelland, will you raise your right hand? Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you will give to the President's Commission in this deposition proceeding will be the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth, so help you God?
Dr. McCLELLAND - I do.
Mr. SPECTER - Dr. McClelland, I show you a translation from the French, of the magazine, "L' Express" issue of February 20, 1964, and ask you if you would read this item, with particular emphasis on a reference to a quotation or statement made by you to a reporter from the St, Louis Post Dispatch.
Dr. McCLELLAND - (Examined instrument referred to.)
Mr. SPECTER - Now, have you had an opportunity to read over that excerpt?
Dr. McCLELLAND - Yes.
Mr. SPECTER - Did you talk to a reporter from the St. Louis Post Dispatch about this matter?
Dr. McCLELLAND - Yes.
Mr. SPECTER - And what was his name?
Dr. McCLELLAND - Richard Dudman.
Mr. SPECTER - And when did you have that conversation with Mr. Dudman
Dr. McCLELLAND - As well as I recall, it was the day after the assassination, as nearly as I can recall, but I'm not certain about that.
Mr. SPECTER - Will you tell me as closely as you remember what he said to you and you said to him, please?
Dr. McCLELLAND - The main point he seemed to be making was to attempt to define something about the wound, the nature of the wound, and as near as I can recall, I indicated to him that the wound was a small undamaged--- appearing punctate area in the skin of the neck, the anterior part of the neck, which had the appearance of the usual entrance wound of a bullet, but that this certainly could not be----you couldn't make a statement to that effect with any complete degree of certainty, though we were, as I told him, experienced in seeing wounds of this nature, and usually felt that we could tell the difference between an entrance and an exit wound, and this was, I think, in essence what I told him about the nature of the wound.
Mr. SPECTER - Now, had you actually observed the wound prior to the time the tracheotomy was performed on that neck wound?
Dr. McCLELLAND - No; my knowledge of the entrance wound, as I stated, in my former deposition, was merely from what Dr. Perry told me when I entered the room and began putting on a pair of surgical gloves to assist with the tracheotomy.
Dr. Perry looked up briefly and said that they had made an incision and were in the process of making an incision in the neck, which extended through the middle of the wound in question in the front of the neck.
Mr. SPECTER - Now, you have just characterized it in that last answer as an entrance wound.
Dr. McCLELLAND - Well, perhaps I shouldn't say the wound anyway, not the entrance wound--that might be a slip of the tongue.
Mr. SPECTER - Do you have a firm opinion at this time as to whether it is an entrance wound or exit wound or whatever?
Dr. McCLELLAND - Of course, my opinion now would be colored by everything that I've heard about it and seen since, but I'll say this, if I were simply looking at the wound again and had seen the wound in its unchanged state, and which I did not, and, of course, as I say, it had already been opened up by the tracheotomy incision when I saw the wound--but if I saw the wound in its state in which Dr. Perry described it to me, I would probably initially think this were an entrance wound, knowing nothing about the circumstances as I did at the time, but I really couldn't say--that's the whole point. This would merely be a calculated guess, and that's all, not knowing anything more than just seeing the wound itself.
Mr. SPECTER - But did you, in fact, see the wound prior to the time the incision was made?
Dr. McCLELLAND - No.
Mr. SPECTER - So that any preliminary thought you had even, would be based upon what you had been told by Dr. Perry?
Dr. McCLELLAND - That's right. Mr. SPECTER - Now, did you tell Mr. Dudman of the St. Louis Post Dispatch that you did not in fact see the wound in the neck, but your only information of it came from what Dr. Perry had told you?
Dr. McCLELLAND - I don't recall whether I told him that or not. I really don't remember whether I said I had seen the wound myself or whether I was merely referring to our sort of collective opinion of it, or whether I told him I had not seen the wound and was merely going by Dr. Perry's report of it to me. I don't recall now, this far away in time exactly what I said to him.
Mr. SPECTER - Dr. McClelland, I want to ask you a few additional questions, and some of these questions may duplicate questions which I asked you last Saturday, and the reason for that is, we have not yet had a chance to transcribe the deposition of last Saturday, so I do not have before me the questions I asked you at that time and the answers you gave, and since last Saturday I have taken the depositions of many, many doctors on the same topics, so it is not possible for me to be absolutely certain of the specific questions which I asked you at that time, but permit me to ask you one or several more questions on the subject.
First, how many bullets do you think were involved in inflicting the wounds on President Kennedy which you observed?
Dr. McCLELLAND - At the present time, you mean, or at the immediate moment?
Mr. SPECTER - Well, take the immediate moment and then the present time.
Dr. McCLELLAND - At the moment, of course, it was our impression before we had any other information from any other source at all, when we were just confronted with the acute emergency, the brief thoughts that ran through our minds were that this was one bullet, that perhaps entered through the front of the neck and then in some peculiar fashion which we really had, as I mentioned the other day, to strain to explain to ourselves, had coursed up the front of the vertebra and into the base of the skull and out the rear of the skull.
This would have been a very circuitous route for the bullet to have made, so that when .we did find later on what the circumstances were surrounding the assassination, this was much more readily explainable to ourselves that the two wounds were made by two separate bullets.
Mr. SPECTER - And what is your view or opinion today as to how many bullets inflicted the injuries of President Kennedy?
Dr. McCLELLAND - Two.
Mr. SPECTER - Now, what would be the reason for your changing your opinion in that respect?
Dr. McCLELLAND - Oh, just simply the later reports that we heard from all sources, of all the circumstances surrounding the assassination. Certainly no further first-hand information came to me and made me change my mind in that regard.
Mr. SPECTER - Dr. McClelland, let me ask you to assume a few additional facts, and based on a hypothetical situation which I will put to you and I'll ask you for an opinion.
Assume, if you will, that President Kennedy was shot on the upper right posterior thorax just above the upper border of the scapula at a point 14 Cm. from the tip of the right acromion process and 14 cm. below a tip of the right mastoid process, assume further that that wound of entry was caused by a 6.5-mm. missile shot out of a rifle having a muzzle velocity of approximately 2,000 feet per second, being located 160 to 250 feet away from President Kennedy, that the bullet entered on the point that I described on the President's back, passed between two strap muscles on the posterior aspect of the President's body and moved through the fascial channel without violating the pleura cavity, and exited in the midline lower third anterior portion of the President's neck, would the hole which Dr. Perry described to you on the front side of the President's neck be consistent with the hole which such a bullet' might make in such a trajectory through .the President's body?
Dr. McCLELLAND - Yes; I think so.
Mr. SPECTER - And what would your reasoning be for thinking that that would be a possible hole of exit on those factors as I have outlined them to you?
Dr. McCLELLAND - Well, I think my reasoning would be basically that the missile was traveling mainly through soft tissue, rather than exploding from a bony chamber and that by the time it reached the neck that it had already lost, because of the distance from which it was fired, even though the muzzle velocity was as you stated--would have already lost a good deal of it's initial velocity and kinetic strength and therefore would have perhaps made, particularly, if it were a fragment of the bullet as bullets do sometimes fragment, could have made a small hole like this in exiting. It certainly could have done that.
Mr. SPECTER - What would have happened then to the other portion of the bullet if it had fragmented?
Dr. McCLELLAND - It might have been left along, or portions of it along the missile track--sometimes will be left scattered up and down this. Other fragments will maybe scatter in the wound and sometimes there will be multiple fragments and sometimes maybe only a small fragment out of the main bullet, sometimes a bullet will split in half--this is extremely difficult for me to say just what would happen in a case lake that.
Mr. SPECTER - Well, assuming this situation--that the bullet did not fragment, because the autopsy report shows no fragmentation, that is, it cannot show the absence of fragmentation, but we do know that there were no bullets left in the body at any point, so that no fragment is left in.
Dr. McCLELLAND - I think even then you could make the statement that this wound could have resulted from this type bullet fired through this particular mass of soft tissue, losing that much velocity before it exited from the body. Where you would expect to see this really great hole that is left behind would be, for instance, from a very high velocity missile fired at close range with a heavy caliber bullet, such as a .45 pistol fired at close range, which would make a small entrance hole, relatively, and particularly if it entered some portion of the anatomy such as the head, where there was a sudden change in density from the brain to the skull cavity, as it entered. As it left the body, it would still have a great deal of force behind it and would blow up a large segment of tissue as it exited. But I don't think the bullet of this nature fired from that distance and going through this large area of homogenous soft tissue would necessarily make the usual kind of exit wound like I just described, with a close range high velocity heavy caliber bullet.
This is why it would be difficult to say with certainty as has been implied in some newspaper articles that quoted me, that you could tell for sure that this was an entrance or an exit wound. I think this was blown up a good deal.
Mr. SPECTER - Dr. McClelland, why wasn't the President's body turned over?
Dr. McCLELLAND - The President's body was not turned over because the initial things that were done as in all such cases of extreme emergency are to first establish an airway and second, to stop hemorrhage and replace blood, so that these were the initial things that were carried out immediately without taking time to do a very thorough physical examination, which of course would have required that these other emergency measures not be done immediately.
Mr. SPECTER - Did you make any examination of the President's back at all?
Dr. McCLELLAND - No.
Mr. SPECTER - Was any examination of the President's back made to your knowledge?
Dr. McCLELLAND - Not here no.
Mr. SPECTER - Do you have anything to add which you think might be helpful in any way to the Commission?
Dr. McCLELLAND - No; I think not except again to emphasize perhaps that some of our statements to the press about the nature of the wound may have been misleading, possibly--probably ,because of our fault in tolling it in such a way that they misinterpreted our certainty of being able to tell entrance from exit wounds, which as we say, we generally can make an educated guess about these things but cannot be certain about them. I think they attributed too much certainty to us about that.
Mr. SPECTER - Now, have you talked to anyone from the Federal Government about this matter since I took your deposition last Saturday?
Dr. McCLELLAND - No.
Mr. SPECTER - And did you and I chat for a moment or two with my showing you this translation of "L' Express" prior to the time we went on the record here?
Dr. McCLELLAND - Yes.
Mr. SPECTER - And is the information which you gave to me in response to my questions the same that we put on the record here?
Dr. McCLELLAND - To the best of my knowledge---yes
Mr. SPECTER - Thank you very much, Dr. McClelland.
Dr. McCLELLAND - All right. Thank you

luni, 17 septembrie 2012

Success 2012: Bjarni Tryggvason, Canadian engineer and a former NRC/CSA astronaut. He served as a Payload Specialist on Space Shuttle mission STS-85 in 1997



Bjarni V. Tryggvason (born September 21, 1945) is an Icelandic-born Canadian engineer and a former NRC/CSA astronaut. He served as a Payload Specialist on Space Shuttle mission STS-85 in 1997, a 12-day mission to study changes in the Earth’s atmosphere.

Tryggvason was born in Reykjavík, Iceland, but considers Vancouver, British Columbia, to be his hometown. He has two children. Bjarni Tryggvason has about 4,000 hours of flight experience, holds an Airline Transport Rating and has been a flight instructor. He's currently active in acrobatic flight and once qualified as captain in the Tutor jet trainer with the Canadian Air Force. After completing high school in Richmond, BC, he received a Bachelor of Applied Science in Engineering Physics from the University of British Columbia in 1972 and did postgraduate work in engineering with specialization in applied mathematics and fluid dynamics at the University of Western Ontario.
He is a member of the Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute. He received an honorary doctorate from the University of Western Ontario in 1998, and one from the University of Iceland in 2000.

He worked as a meteorologist with the cloud physics group at the Atmospheric Environment Service in Toronto in 1972 and 1973. In 1974, he joined the University of Western Ontario to work as a research associate at the Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel Laboratory working on projects involving rigid and aero-elastic model studies of wind effects on structures.
In 1978, he was a guest research associate at Kyoto University, Japan, followed by a similar position at James Cook University in Townsville, Australia. In late 1979, he returned to the University of Western Ontario as a lecturer in applied mathematics.
In 1982, he joined the Low Speed Aerodynamics Laboratory at the National Research Council (NRC) in Ottawa. He became part of the NRC team assembled to study the sinking of the Ocean Ranger oil rig in support of the Royal Commission investigation into that tragedy. He designed and led the aerodynamics tests, which established the wind loads acting on the rig. Between 1981 and 1992, he was also a part-time lecturer at the University of Ottawa and Carleton University, teaching graduate courses on structural dynamics and random vibrations.
He was one of the six Canadian astronauts selected in December 1983. He was back-up Payload Specialist to Steven MacLean for the CANEX-2 set of experiments which flew on Mission STS-52, October 22 to November 1, 1992. He was the Project Engineer for the design of the SVS target spacecraft which was deployed during that mission.
He was the principal investigator in the development of the Large Motion Isolation Mount (LMIM) which has flown numerous times on the NASA Boeing KC-135 and DC-9 aircraft, and for the Microgravity vibration Isolation Mount (MIM) which operated on the Russian Mir space station from April 1996 until January 1998, and for the MIM-2 which flew on STS-85 in August 1997. The MIM was used on the Mir to support several Canadian and US experiments in material science and fluid physics.
Tryggvason served as a Payload Specialist on STS-85 (August 7-19, 1997), a 12 day mission to study changes in the Earth’s atmosphere. During the flight, his primary role was testing MIM-2 and performing fluid dynamics experiments designed to examine sensitivity to spacecraft vibrations. This work was directed at developing better understanding of the need for systems such as the MIM on the International Space Station (ISS) and on the effect of vibrations on the many experiments to be performed on the ISS. The mission was accomplished in 189 Earth orbits, traveling 4.7 million miles in 284 hours and 27 minutes.
 In August 1998, Tryggvason was invited by NASA to take part in their 1998 Mission Specialist Class held at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. This training consisted of two years of physical and academic training relating to future missions. This class was the first group of astronauts to be trained as both Mission Specialist for the Space Shuttle and as potential crewmembers for the ISS. He was initially assigned as a Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory (SAIL) crew representative. SAIL is used to test, check out, and verify Shuttle flight software prior to use on the shuttle. He also supported integrated simulations on the ISS Training Facility. This facility is used for ISS crew training as well as in support of training the ISS Mission Control team.
He retired from the Canadian Space Agency effective June 2008. He returned to teaching at the University of Western Ontario, in London, Ontario.On February 22, 2009, he piloted a replica of Alexander Graham Bell's Silver Dart, from the ice on Baddeck Bay, Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. The flight commemorated the centennial of the first flight in Canada and the British Empire. Due to poor weather conditions expected on February 23, 2009, the flight occurred one day before the actual centenary of the original Silver Dart's flight

duminică, 16 septembrie 2012

Success 2012: Juan Bautista, the french barefoot bullfighter


Arles (Francia), el 11 de julio de 1981
Debut con caballos: el 13 de marzo de 1998, en Querétaro (México), novilllos de Los Martínez, con Alberto Huerta y Gómez Escorial.
Debut como novillero en la Real Maestranza de Sevilla: el 23 de abril de 1999.
Confirmación en Las Ventas: en la tarde del 2 de octubre de 1999.
Debut en Las Ventas: en la tarde del 2 de junio de 1999.
Alternativa: el 11 de septiembre de 1999 en Arlés (Francia).  Padrino: Espartaco. Testigo: César Rincón. Toros de Zalduendo (oreja y ovación).
Debut como matador en la Real Maestranza de Sevilla: en la tarde del 24 de abril del 2000.
Temporada 2009: torea en Valdemorillo la tarde del 6 de febrero.
Temporada 2008: corta dos orejas en Medellín la tarde del 2 de febrero. Torea en Castellón la tarde del 27 de febrero. Torea en Valencia la tarde del 14 de marzo. Torea en Las Ventas la tarde del 16 de marzo. Torea en Arlés la tarde del 22 de marzo. Torea en Saint Martin de Crau la tarde del 12 de abril. Corta oreja en Guijuelo (Salamanca) la tarde del 26 de abril. Corta cuatro orejas en Palavas la tarde del 1º de mayo.Corta cuatro orejas en Palavas la tarde del 1º de mayo. Torea en Nimes la tarde del 9 de mayo. Torea en Nimes la mañana del 11 de mayo. Corta oreja en Valladolid la tarde del 13 de mayo. Torea en Las Ventas la tarde del 15 de mayo. Corta dos orejas en Granada la tarde del 18 de mayo. Torea en Las Ventas la tarde del 20 de mayo. Corta oreja en Toledo la tarde del 25 de mayo. Corta tres en Valdepeñas la tarde del 7 de junio. Torea en Las Ventas la tarde del 15 de junio. Torea en Alicante la tarde del 18 de junio. Corta oreja en Tolosa la tarde del 22 de junio. Torea en Soria la tarde del 28 de junio. Corta oreja en Eauze la tarde del 6 de julio. Torea en Pamplona la tarde del 10 de julio. Corta oreja en Mont de Marsan la tarde del 21 de julio. Corta oreja en Tudela la tarde del 27 de julio. Corta tres orejas en Estella la tarde del 2 de agosto. Torea en La Monumental de Barcelona la tarde del 3 de agosto. Corta cuatro orejas en Saintes Maries de la Mer la tarde del 9 de agosto. Corta oreja en Bayona la tarde del 10 agosto. Corta oreja en Huesca la tarde del 12 de agosto. Corta dos orejas en San Sebastián la tarde del 14 de agosto. Torea en Málaga la tarde del 15 de agosto. Corta oreja en Dax la tarde del 16 de agosto. Corta oreja y rabo en Cieza la tarde del 24 de agosto. Corta oreja en San Sebastián de los Reyes la tarde del 31 de agosto. Corta dos orejas en Dax la tarde del 6 de septiembre. Corta dos orejas en Arles la tarde del 13 de septiembre. Corta oreja en Salamanca la tarde del 14 de septiembre. Torea en Murcia la tarde del 18 de septiembre. Corta tres orejas y rabo en Nimes la mañana del 21 de septiembre. Corta tres orejas en Corella la tarde del 29 de septiembre. Corta oreja en el Festival de Chichón la tarde del 18 de octubre.



Temporada 2007: torea en Medellín la tarde del 3 de febrero. Corta dos orejas en el Festival en Medellín la tarde del 9 de febrero. Corta tres orejas en Arles la tarde del 6 de abril. Corta dos orejas en Palavas la tarde del 8 de mayo. Torea en Las Ventas la tarde del 12 de mayo. Corta oreja en Las Ventas la tarde del 22 de mayo. Torea en Nimes la tarde del 25 de mayo. Corta dos orejas en Nimes la mañana del 26 de mayo. Corta oreja en Granada la tarde del 3 de junio. Corta oreja en Alicante la tarde del 18 de junio. Torea en Soria la tarde del 23 de junio. Corta oreja en Segovia la tarde del 29 de junio. Corta dos orejas en Fenouillet la tarde del 30 de junio. Corta dos orejas en Eauze la tarde del 8 de julio. Torea en Pamplona la tarde del 10 de julio. Corta oreja en Mont de Marsan la tarde del 24 de julio. Corta oreja en Tudela la tarde del 28 de julio. Corta dos orejas en Beaucaire (Francia) la tarde del 29 de julio. Corta oreja en Vitoria la tarde del 5 de agosto. Torea en Málaga la tarde del 10 de agosto. Torea en Baeza la tarde del 11 de agosto. Corta dos orejas en Bayona la tarde del 12 de agosto. Corta oreja en Beziers la tarde del 13 de agosto. Corta dos orejas en Dax la tarde del 14 de agosto. Corta dos orejas en Saintes Marie de la Mer la tarde del 15 de agosto. Corta dos orejas y rabo, indulta toro, en Guijuelo (Salamanca) la tarde del 18 de agosto. Corta dos orejas en Leganés la tarde del 19 de agosto. Corta oreja en Almería la tarde del 21 de agosto. Corta oreja en Bilbao la tarde del 22 de agosto. Corta tres en Iniesta la tarde del 24 de agosto. Corta oreja en Colmenar Viejo la tarde del 25 de agosto. Corta dos orejas en San Sebastián de los Reyes la tarde del 26 de agosto. Torea en Arles la tarde del 7 de septiembre. Corta dos orejas en Alcañiz la tarde del 8 de septiembre. Corta oreja en Aranda de Duero la tarde del 10 de septiembre. Torea en Albacete la tarde del 13 de septiembre. Corta tres orejas en Nimes la mañana del 15 de septiembre. Corta tres orejas y rabo en San Agustín de Guadalix (Madrid) la tarde del 16 de septiembre. Torea en Logroño la tarde del 17 de septiembre. Corta tres orejas y rabo, indulta toro, en Torrijos la tarde del 30 de septiembre. Corta dos orejas en Las Ventas la tarde del 6 de octubre. Torea en Valencia la tarde del 9 de octubre. Torea en Zaragoza la tarde del 10 de octubre. Corta dos orejas y rabo en el Festival de Chichón la tarde del 13 de octubre. Torea en Quito la tarde del 1 de diciembre. Corta dos orejas en Cali la tarde del 27 de diciembre.

Temporada 2006: corta tres orejas en Cadereyta la tarde del 22 de enero. Torea en Arles la tarde del 15 de abril. Torea en Barcelona la tarde del 16 de abril. Corta dos orejas en Moralzarzal la tarde del 1 de mayo. Corta tres orejas en Palavas la tarde del 7 de mayo. Corta oreja en Floirac la tarde del 14 de mayo. Corta tres orejas en Nimes la tarde del 3 de junio. Corta tres orejas en Daganzo (Madrid) la tarde del 10 de junio. Corta oreja en Mauguio (Francia) la tarde del 11 de junio. Corta oreja en Istres (Francia) la tarde del 18 de junio. Torea en Toulouse la tarde del 1 de julio. Corta tres orejas en Châteaurenard (Francia) la tarde del 8 de julio. Corta oreja en Tijuana la tarde del 14 de julio. Corta dos orejas en Vitoria la tarde del 9 de agosto. Corta oreja en Beziers la tarde del 12 de agosto. Corta tres orejas y rabo, indulta toro, en Fréjus la tarde del 13 de agosto. Corta cuatro orejas en Dax la tarde del 15 de agosto. Torea en Bayona la tarde del 2 de septiembre. Corta dos orejas en Sotillo de la Adrada (Ávila) la tarde del 7 de septiembre. Torea en Arles la tarde del 8 de septiembre. Torea en Barcelona la tarde del 10 de septiembre. Corta tres orejas en Yebra (Guadalajara) la tarde del 12 de septiembre. Corta dos orejas en Nimes la mañana del 17 de septiembre. Corta cuatro orejas y rabo en el Festival en Palavás la tarde del 23 de septiembre. Corta oreja en Querétaro la tarde del 16 de diciembre. Corta oreja en Cali la tarde del 30 de diciembre. Torea en Cali la tarde del 31 de noviembre.
Temporada 2005: corta oreja en Chihuahua, en la tarde del 6 de marzo. Lidia toros en Ciudad Valles (San Luis de Potosí), en la tarde del 19 de marzo. Corta una oreja en Arles, en la tarde del 25 de marzo. Corta oreja en Floirac, en la tarde del 24 de abril. Corta oreja en Palavas la tarde del 1º de mayo. Corta dos orejas en Nimes la tarde del 14 de mayo. Torea en Soria la tarde del 29 de junio. Corta oreja en Navas del Marqués la tarde del 13 de julio. Corta oreja en Vitoria la tarde del 9 de agosto. Corta oreja en Beziers la tarde del 13 de agosto. Corta tres orejas en Saintes Maires de la Mer la tarde del 15 de agosto. Corta oreja en Nimes la tarde del 16 de septiembre. Corta dos orejas en Arles la tarde del 10 de septiembre. Torea en Medina del Pomar la tarde del 2 octubre. Corta dos oreja y rabo en el festival benéfico de Saint Guilles la tarde del 16 de octubre.
Torea en Tijuana la tarde del 6 de noviembre. Corta dos orejas y rabo en Monterrey la tarde del 4 de diciembre. Corta dos orejas en Querétaro la tarde del 17 de diciembre.