joi, 30 mai 2013

Success 2013: Hristo Stoichkov, nicknamed 'El Pistolero'. He was part of Johan Cruyff's 'Dream Team' and helped Barcelona to one of the most successful eras of the club, winning the Primera Division four years in a row

Hristo Stoichkov Stoichkov (Bulgarian: Христо Стоичков Стоичков), sometimes Stoitchkov; born 8 February 1966 in Plovdiv) is a retired Bulgarian footballer.

He is regarded as one of the best footballers of his generation and the greatest Bulgarian footballer of all time. Nicknamed The Dagger (Камата), The Dog (Кучето), The Modern Left (Модерния ляв).

At Barcelona he earned the Spanish nickname 'El Pistolero' which translates to 'the gunslinger'. He was a member of the Bulgaria national team that finished fourth at the 1994 World Cup, of which he was the top scorer with 6 goals.

Apart from his footballing talent, he was notable for his on-pitch temper. His awards include the European Golden Boot, the Ballon d'Or, the World Cup Golden Boot and the World Cup Bronze Ball.

Stoichkov began his career in his hometown, moving to Hebros in 1984. The next year he went to CSKA Sofia. There, he was involved in a fight during the final of the 1985 Bulgarian Cup which resulted in an original lifelong ban, which was eventually reduced to a month suspension.

After he was brought back to football, he managed to win the European Golden Boot with CSKA by scoring 38 goals in 30 games. He then moved on to FC Barcelona, where he was part of Johan Cruyff's 'Dream Team', Stoichkov helped Barcelona to one of the most successful eras of the club, winning the Primera Division four years in a row between 1991 and 1994 and the European Cup after defeating Sampdoria in 1992. During his stay in Barcelona, he had become an idol for the club's fans, and was Barça's most popular player at the time, having earned a place in the supporters' hearts much like Johan Neeskens and Diego Maradona in the past. In Barcelona Stoichkov played in tandem with Romário.

In his first season with the club Stoichkov was suspended for two months for stomping on a referee's foot, but he still netted 14 league goals and six more in the Cup Winners' Cup. Stoichkov then had short spells with Parma, Al-Nassr, and finally finishing his career in Japan with Kashiwa Reysol and the United States with the Chicago Fire and D.C. United.

Stoichkov played as a left winger who was known for his explosive acceleration and speed dribbling, and for taking unpredictable shots on goal. He was also notable at taking free kicks and penalties as well as being among the best crossers in the world at his prime. He gained infamy because of his aggressive temper on the pitch.

He could often be seen arguing with the referee, or with his opponents. In 2006, he was sued by a former American University college student whose leg he broke in a violent tackle during a match against D.C. United in 2003.


The case was settled out of court in 2007 for undisclosed financial terms. The student's coach called Stoichkov's challenge "criminal". Ray Hudson, who coached D.C. United for whom Stoichkov played at the time, called it a "rash tackle". Following an investigation by MLS, Stoichkov was suspended two games and fined $2,000.


Honours at  Barcelona
1990–91, 1991–92, 1992–93, 1993–94, 1997–98
1992, 1994, 1996
1991–92, Runner-Up 1993–94
1992, 1997
1996–97
1996–97

Success 2013: Hristo Stoichkov, retired Bulgarian footballer that was awarded the World Cup Golden Boot (1994). He retired from internationals in 1999 with 37 goals in 83 appearances

Hristo Stoichkov Stoichkov, sometimes Stoitchkov; born 8 February 1966 in Plovdiv) is a retired Bulgarian footballer. He is regarded as one of the best footballers of his generation and the greatest Bulgarian footballer of all time. Nicknamed The Dagger (Камата), The Dog (Кучето), The Modern Left (Модерния ляв). At Barcelona he earned the Spanish nickname 'El Pistolero' which translates to 'the gunslinger'. He was a member of the Bulgaria national team that finished fourth at the 1994 World Cup, of which he was the top scorer with 6 goals. Apart from his footballing talent, he was notable for his on-pitch temper. His awards include the European Golden Boot, the Ballon d'Or, the World Cup Golden Boot and the World Cup Bronze Ball.

At the 1994 World Cup, Stoichkov was awarded the World Cup Golden Boot as the joint top goal scorer of the tournament (with Oleg Salenko), with six goals, as well as earning the Bronze Ball award. He led Bulgaria past Germany to the semi-finals, where they lost 2–1 to Italy. They subsequently lost the third place play-off to Sweden, 4–0.

Bulgaria finished second in the qualifying group for Euro 1996 after the first place was taken by the eventual winners, Germany. Stoichkov scored 10 goals for his team during the qualifiers, as Bulgaria qualified as one of the best 6 runners-up. In the first match against Germany in Sofia, Bulgaria were 2–0 down at half-time. Stoichkov equalized with two goals from penalties and Emil Kostadinov also scored for a 3–2 win. Bulgaria lost the second match in Germany 3–1.
During the finals, Bulgaria lost 3–1 in the decisive group match against a very strong France side (the future World Champions); at the same time, in the other match, Spain won 2–1 late on against Romania and so the Bulgarians went out. In that tournament, Stoichkov scored 3 goals in 3 matches, and another goal against Spain was disallowed for offside, though action replays show that he was actually on-side. Stoitchkov was the only player to score from a free kick (against France) in this tournament.
He was also part of the squad that was eliminated in the first round of the 1998 World Cup. Bulgaria was not nearly as strong as in previous years, earning only one point in a 0–0 draw against Paraguay and scoring only one goal through Kostadinov in a 6–1 defeat by Spain in the so-called "Group of Death".
Stoichkov retired from internationals in 1999 with 37 goals in 83 appearances. Subsequently he was the coach of the Bulgarian national team from 2004 to April 2007.

miercuri, 29 mai 2013

Success 2013: Hristo Stoichkov, the greatest Bulgarian footballer of all time. His awards include the European Golden Boot, the Ballon d'Or, the World Cup Golden Boot and the World Cup Bronze Ball

Hristo Stoichkov Stoichkov, sometimes Stoitchkov; born 8 February 1966 in Plovdiv) is a retired Bulgarian footballer. He is regarded as one of the best footballers of his generation and the greatest Bulgarian footballer of all time. Nicknamed The Dagger (Камата), The Dog (Кучето), The Modern Left (Модерния ляв). At Barcelona he earned the Spanish nickname 'El Pistolero' which translates to 'the gunslinger'.

He was a member of the Bulgaria national team that finished fourth at the 1994 World Cup, of which he was the top scorer with 6 goals. Apart from his footballing talent, he was notable for his on-pitch temper. His awards include the European Golden Boot, the Ballon d'Or, the World Cup Golden Boot and the World Cup Bronze Ball.

At the 1994 World Cup, Stoichkov was awarded the World Cup Golden Boot as the joint top goal scorer of the tournament (with Oleg Salenko), with six goals, as well as earning the Bronze Ball award. He led Bulgaria past Germany to the semi-finals, where they lost 2–1 to Italy. They subsequently lost the third place play-off to Sweden, 4–0.

 In 1994, he was named European Footballer of the Year after leading his national side to the 1994 World Cup semi-finals.


Stoichkov retired from internationals in 1999 with 37 goals in 83 appearances. Subsequently he was the coach of the Bulgarian national team from 2004 to April 2007.


marți, 28 mai 2013

Success 2013: Manolo Santana, spanish former tennis player who was ranked World No. 1 in 1966. Before winning Wimbledon he was quoted as saying "The grass is just for cows"

Manuel Martínez Santana, best known as Manolo Santana, (born 10 May 1938 in Madrid) is a former amateur tennis champion from Spain who was ranked World No. 1 in 1966. He was born in Madrid.

Wimbledon he was quoted as saying "The grass is just for cows."[citation needed] He thought that tennis should be played on artificial surfaces as opposed to lawn tennis courts like the ones at Wimbledon. This statement has been repeated throughout the years by numerous players including Ivan Lendl, Marat Safin, Marcelo Ríos, and Jan Kodeš (despite his 1973 victory at Wimbledon.

Before winning Wimbledon he was quoted as saying "The grass is just for cows." He thought that tennis should be played on artificial surfaces as opposed to lawn tennis courts like the ones at Wimbledon. This statement has been repeated throughout the years by numerous players including Ivan Lendl, Marat Safin, Marcelo Ríos, and Jan Kodeš (despite his 1973 victory at Wimbledon).

In 1965, Santana, who had begun his career as a ball boy and "picked up" the game, led Spain to unexpected victory over the US in the Davis Cup, and he became a national hero.

Despite his previous Grand Slam successes in the French Championships (1961, 1964) and the U.S. Championships (1965), Santana's win at the 1966 Wimbledon lawn tennis championships was a surprise, where he defeated the sixth seed Dennis Ralston 6–4, 11–9, 6–4. This was his last Grand slam title. His last big tournament win was in 1970 by winning Barcelona where he defeated Rod Laver 6–4 6–3 6–4. He also captured the doubles title in Barcelona that year when he teamed with Lew Hoad to defeat Laver/Andrés Gimeno 6–4 9–7 7–5. He was named to the Hall of Fame in 1984.
At the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City, Santana won the Gold medal in Singles, though tennis was only a demonstration sport at that time. It became a medal sport in 1988 (after another demonstration event in 1984).
He later was captain of the Spanish Copa Davis Team twice, once in the '80s and again for four and a half years in the mid-'90s, until he was dismissed in 1999. Currently, he is the organizer of the Madrid Masters.

He manages the Manolo Santana Racquets club, a tennis club in Marbella, and the Sport Center Manolo Santana, in Madrid.
Santana and Lleyton Hewitt are the only Wimbledon Men's Singles champions to lose in the first round in the following year; Hewitt's loss was during the Open Era, while Santana's was before the Open Era.
He appeared at the 2011 Wimbledon Championships in London, England in the Royal Box to watch the Men's Final which was between his fellow countryman Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic (who had just become World No. 1 after winning his semi-final match against Jo-Wilfried Tsonga).

Grand Slam record

French championships

  • Singles champion: 1961, 1964
  • Doubles champion: 1963

Wimbledon championships

  • Singles champion: 1966

U.S. championships

  • Singles champion: 1965

luni, 13 mai 2013

Success 2013: Robert Buchanan, one of the last surviving ground crew member of the 1937 Hindenburg crash

Robert Buchanan says he sometimes has trouble remembering what he did 10 minutes ago. But he can recall in vivid detail the day 76 years ago when he watched the luxurious airship Hindenburg erupt into a fireball.
Flames roared across the surface of the mighty German dirigible only 100 or so feet above him, singing his hair as he ran for his life.
“It was a piff-puff, just like someone would leave the gas on and not get the flame to it,” said Buchanan, one of the last living members of the ground crew waiting to help the Hindenburg land.
Seventysix years ago, the hydrogen-filled Hindenburg ignited while easing toward its mooring mast at the U.S. Navy base in Lakehurst. The blaze killed 35 people on board and one person in the ground crew; 62 passengers and crew members survived.
“I ran quite a distance because the heat, the flame, kept shooting out ahead of me,” said Buchanan, of nearby Tuckerton. “And I really didn’t think I was going to make it, frankly.” (NBC NEWS)

The Hindenburg was going to revolutionize trans-Atlantic travel. A trip from Europe to the United States that would take a choppy five to six days by steamship — making some passengers lose their lunch along the way — suddenly could be done in 2½.
Bound from Frankfurt, Germany, it was a luxury liner in the air. It had a lounge with a baby grand piano made out of aluminum, so as not to affect the weight of the hydrogen-filled airship, and a pressurized room for smokers.
To a world ravaged for seven years by the Great Depression — which created scenes such as stockbrokers selling apples from pushcarts and men leaving homes with empty briefcases to pretend they still had jobs — possibilities again seemed limitless.
In less than a minute, the renewed hope collapsed in a fiery heap on a sandy field in New Jersey. A shaken radio announcer from Chicago named Herbert Morrison watched burning bodies running from the downed Hindenburg in Lakehurst and uttered the line that would be remembered for the ages.
"Oh, the humanity!"
Along with the Titanic sinking in 1912 and the Space Shuttle Challenger exploding in 1986, the Hindenburg burning and crashing is one of the three most famous passenger craft disasters of the 20th century.
Three-quarters of a century later, the images remain indelible.
If you had been there, this, according to witnesses, is what you would have seen:
The submarine-shaped airship wafting over Ocean County like a dandelion seed as it calmly makes its way to a mooring mast at the Naval Air Station in Lakehurst.
Seemingly out of nowhere, flames shooting from the tail.
The burning zeppelin crashing, tail first, then collapsing like an accordion as a halo of fire surrounds it and members of the ground crew run like hell.
The word "Hindenburg" on the side of the airship being burned away as the fireball turns the world’s largest aircraft into a glowing skeleton of disintegrating bones.
Ground crew members running back to the zeppelin to help passengers.
A passenger emerging from the burning airship, stumbling, then getting up. Then falling again.
The Hindenburg was up in flames in barely more than a half-minute, giving passengers and crew about the time of a TV commercial to escape with their lives.
Thirty-five passengers and crew on board and one ground crew member, 51-year-old Allen Hagaman of Jackson, were killed. The other 62 people on board survived, some would say miraculously.
"You just never forget a thing like that," Robert C. Buchanan, 92, the last known living member of the civilian ground crew that awaited the Hindenburg, said during an interview from his family’s home in Waretown. "It’s so spectacular. I considered that I wasn’t going to survive it — that’s how bad it was. There aren’t many nights in a month that I don’t give it a little thought, I’ll tell you, and the different possibilities and things that could have happened."
An acrobat on board was able to use his tumbling skills to save his life and escape with only an injured ankle.
The Hindenburg captain did not fare as well, being burned so badly that he spent the rest of his life wearing a prosthetic nose whenever he left his house.
More than 100,000 people descended on Lakehurst the next day.
Proving that scammers are universal for all ages, some of the locals burned their own utensils and tin cans and set up roadside stands proclaiming their wares were "Authentic Hindenburg Souvenirs."
There were buyers. (nj.com)